A trade show is the ideal place to spot upcoming trends and new product innovations and Eurobike was no exception. Sustainability, customisation, and improving on traditional product designs to make cyclists’ lives easier were among the trends spotted.

How sustainable and eco-friendly the product is are among the most important concerns for consumers. By adding the colour to the product during the weaving stage, the dying process uses 75% of the water, 67% chemicals and 39% energy compared to the usual methods, a manufacturer found.

SQLab-grips
The SQLab grip series enable cyclists to get the best grip for their hand and cycle.

Cyclists want good grip, comfort and support on their cycles’ handles, but life’s not always one-size-fits-all. The SQlab set of grips gives the cyclist the chance to get the best ergonomic grip for his hand on any cycle. It was also the Gold winner in this year’s Eurobike Awards in the Accessories category. “Apart from the saddle, the grips are the most important point of contact between rider and cycle,” said jury members. “With its new series of grips, SQLab has expanded its range: four different designs each in three different sizes mean that all riders can be sure of finding the right grip for every ride.”

Altona-by-Alpina
Alpina’s Altona helmet incorporates a visor that allows enough space so that cyclists can also wear their spectacles. Photo: Messe Friedrichshafen.

Finding sunglasses to wear over spectacles can be a problem, especially when adding a helmet, and not everyone has a pair of prescription sunglasses. These cyclists will be glad to hear about a new helmet that has been designed with a visor incorporated into it: the visor tints itself in brighter conditions and has enough space between it and the face so that the cyclist can wear spectacles should he need it.

Another source of frustration is tyre punctures. An airless tyre was exhibited at the show: the solid expanded thermoplastic polyurethane (E-TPU) inner tube consists of thousands of sealed air balls (similar to what is used in some running shoes) and it feels similar to air pressure of around 3.5 bar.

Elumatik-demonstration
The small Elumatik tyre pump by M-Wave/Messingschlager. Photo: Messe Friedrichshafen.

Talking about keeping tyres inflated, there is now an electric tyre pump, which is no bigger than two smartphones and looks like a power bank. The user can select up to a maximum of 7 bar air pressure and the pump head is compatible with all standard valves.

Imagine a MTB clincher-wheelset that weighs 1kg. Well, that’s what’s possible thanks to the use of textile spokes and lightweight carbon rims. “With its spokes based on polyester fibres, Tune is employing a brand-new material to make wheels even lighter. A genuine innovation.”

Cyclists can now show when they’re braking. “The brake light is small, very bright and complies with road traffic regulations,” Eurobike Award jury members commented. “There are many options for mounting it on the bike. From the aspect of safety, we like the fact that it reacts to even a slight contact with the brake lever.”

Bike-light-plus-plus
Because it can be attached to so many items, the Plus light from Knog can be used for a variety of activities.

Versatility is the name-of-the-game for the LED strip light that can be mounted onto a handle bar, post, seat stays, cycle fork, clothing, a bag, helmet, and even socks – this thanks to the magnet in its backing. The light is available in a rear- and forward-facing version. Its use isn’t limited to cycling either: runners can attach to clothing, campers to tents, it can even be used indoors by sticking it to a steel object.

Wike-Salamander-Cycle-Stroller
The Wike Salamander Cycle Stroller can be a cycle, stroller or delivery cart.

Versatility also extends to cycles, with a bicycle that converts into a stroller or delivery cart in under five seconds. The stroller is designed to fit public transport.

Woom-helmets
Woom kids’ helmets feature a protective rubber sun visor.

There were also products specifically designed for kids to cater for their ‘quirks’. An example is a kids’ helmet that has a built-in rubber sun visor. Young kids haven’t yet developed the reflex to put their hands out when they fall and the visor doubles as forehead protection in this situation.

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